IDG Contributor Network: Are tech/business evangelists necessary to ensure your company stays relevant?

Technology/business evangelist is a fairly new position in many companies, but an absolutely necessary one and well worth the price tag to maintain resilience and relevance. In this day and age affective communications between the C-suite stakeholde…

Technology/business evangelist is a fairly new position in many companies, but an absolutely necessary one and well worth the price tag to maintain resilience and relevance. In this day and age affective communications between the C-suite stakeholders, vendors, partners, potential customers and investors are extremely important to every business whether it be start-up, mid-tier or enterprise.

Entrepreneurial energy is running rampant and the lifespan of companies are “here today, gone tomorrow” – whether being acquired or falling short. Technology/business evangelists on the payroll can make the difference in a company’s longevity and reputation.

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IDG Contributor Network: Made in India? Vietnam? Mexico?

India has to play catch-up
Although India has been on US manufacturer’s radar for many years, India has growing pains to meet manufacturing production support demands and therefore their confidence. India’s completely unhinged economic development e…

India has to play catch-up

Although India has been on US manufacturer’s radar for many years, India has growing pains to meet manufacturing production support demands and therefore their confidence. India’s completely unhinged economic development ecosystem and political instability can’t compete with China’s 10% year over year economic and technological growth as well as cheap labor. Last year, Samsung opened in India, what Samsung claimed is the world’s largest mobile phone plant in order to meet the global phone demand.

In January of this year, Apple moved some of its iPhone assembly from Foxconn China to Foxconn India. Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd., better known as Foxconn, known for its ill treatment of its workers and stated to be the world’s largest multinational electronics manufacturing company that has its headquarters in Taiwan. Foxconn’s customer list includes Amazon, Apple, Blackberry, Nokia and Sony just to name a few. Samsung does its own manufacturing as well as some of Apple’s and has reported making more money from its manufacturing for Apple over its own Samsung mobile phones. The view is “If US manufacturers help build it the growth and benefits will come.”

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IDG Contributor Network: Peace or ‘Star Wars’ – US vs. China

Collateral damage is not important to China as it demonstrates its insatiable thirst for advancement and economic domination. China’s leverage of its year over year 10% economic growth has made its technological R&D arsenal in 5G, AI, mobile dev…

Collateral damage is not important to China as it demonstrates its insatiable thirst for advancement and economic domination. China’s leverage of its year over year 10% economic growth has made its technological R&D arsenal in 5G, AI, mobile devices, lasers and space weaponry formidable. China’s Huawei, the world’s number one telecommunications company whose founder Ren Zhengfei was once a member of the People’s Liberation Army, holds second place for most International 5G Patents. ZTE, another Chinese telecom company, is said to hold third with Samsung from South Korea first.

In 2018, Apple took a back seat to Huawei as the second largest smartphone supplier. China launched their “New Generation Artificial Intelligence Development Plan” (AI) in 2017, with focus on facial recognition for surveillance. Even scarier, China’s electromagnetic laser and microwave weaponry deployed to attack war ships and military facilities and as “anti-satellite” (ASAT) next generation “Star Wars” space weapons.

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IDG Contributor Network: Lithium-ion a pawn in economic domination

The demand for cobalt far out paces its production. Lithium cobalt oxide cathodes consist of 60% cobalt and offer unbeatable energy density. For the Dominican Republic of the Congo (DRC), cobalt is a global political pawn. Manufacturers of rechargea…

The demand for cobalt far out paces its production. Lithium cobalt oxide cathodes consist of 60% cobalt and offer unbeatable energy density. For the Dominican Republic of the Congo (DRC), cobalt is a global political pawn. Manufacturers of rechargeable Lithium-ion battery storage or manufacturers requiring these batteries are locking in cobalt delivery now for the long-term to take advantage of the current dip in the cobalt market. Limits of available cobalt may cause hording or price increases; therefore reduced digital-device and electric-vehicle release speeds and speed for adoption.

Precarious and precious cobalt landscape

Switzerland’s Glencore with $58 billion in market share is the world’s largest commodity producer with mines in 50 countries and the prime cobalt producer in the DRC. Composites of cobalt can be coupled with other mineral deposits when they come out of the ground. The DRC has a limit on uranium exports that prevents some composites of uranium with cobalt ore being exported. Glencore’s construction of an ion exchange plant would remove uranium from the ore thus allowing more cobalt supply availability for export. Unsuccessfully trying to manipulate and control its most prize commodity, the DRC Mines Minister Martin Kabwelulu Labilo, directed Glencore to suspend construction of its $25 million ion exchange plant and in a fit of insanity, ordered suspension of all cobalt concentrate exports. Thankfully, he came to some sense and retracted his last order the very next day.

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