Vodafone launches new bonus pack in Tamil Nadu, offers home tariff on national roaming

Vodafone today launched a new ‘Roam Like Home’ Bonus Pack for its pre-paid customers in Tamil Nadu. This pack costs Rs. 61 and lets Vodafone customers travelling anywhere in India enjoy home calling rates, for a period of 28 days. The Rs. 61 Vodafone ‘Roam Like Home’ pack is available from Vodafone stores & Mini Stores or … Continue reading “Vodafone launches new bonus pack in Tamil Nadu, offers home tariff on national roaming”

Vodafone today launched a new ‘Roam Like Home’ Bonus Pack for its pre-paid customers in Tamil Nadu. This pack costs Rs. 61 and lets Vodafone customers travelling anywhere in India enjoy home calling rates, for a period of 28 days. The Rs. 61 Vodafone ‘Roam Like Home’ pack is available from Vodafone stores & Mini Stores or … Continue reading "Vodafone launches new bonus pack in Tamil Nadu, offers home tariff on national roaming"

Airtel offers 100% cashback offer on Rs. 349 unlimited pack for limited period

Reliance Jio offered 100% cashback on its Rs. 399 as a part of Diwali offer earlier this month. Now Airtel has started offering 100% cashback offer on its Rs. 349 unlimited pack for its pre-paid users when you pay for the recharge using Airtel Payments Bank on MyAirtel app. Under this offer, you will get Rs. 50 cashback … Continue reading “Airtel offers 100% cashback offer on Rs. 349 unlimited pack for limited period”

Reliance Jio offered 100% cashback on its Rs. 399 as a part of Diwali offer earlier this month. Now Airtel has started offering 100% cashback offer on its Rs. 349 unlimited pack for its pre-paid users when you pay for the recharge using Airtel Payments Bank on MyAirtel app. Under this offer, you will get Rs. 50 cashback … Continue reading "Airtel offers 100% cashback offer on Rs. 349 unlimited pack for limited period"

IDG Contributor Network: Ascending the stairway to digital heaven

It all starts with a vision. This is literally the most difficult aspect of a digital transformation and its importance shouldn’t be underestimated. You have to know where you want to go and who you want to be before attempting to make broad changes. 

Establishing and validating the vision is a process itself. It’s critical to understand where your vision fits in the market landscape. What are competitors doing? What are the trends in the industry? What customer expectations exist?  You use the answers to these questions to build a customer journey map that will help you execute the vision, as well as lead the transformation. It’s one thing to have a vision and articulate it to others, but you also have to capture it in a way that you can work on it, build on it, refine it and communicate it throughout the organization.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

It all starts with a vision. This is literally the most difficult aspect of a digital transformation and its importance shouldn’t be underestimated. You have to know where you want to go and who you want to be before attempting to make broad changes. 

Establishing and validating the vision is a process itself. It’s critical to understand where your vision fits in the market landscape. What are competitors doing? What are the trends in the industry? What customer expectations exist?  You use the answers to these questions to build a customer journey map that will help you execute the vision, as well as lead the transformation. It’s one thing to have a vision and articulate it to others, but you also have to capture it in a way that you can work on it, build on it, refine it and communicate it throughout the organization.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Ascending the stairway to digital heaven

It all starts with a vision. This is literally the most difficult aspect of a digital transformation and its importance shouldn’t be underestimated. You have to know where you want to go and who you want to be before attempting to make broad changes. 

Establishing and validating the vision is a process itself. It’s critical to understand where your vision fits in the market landscape. What are competitors doing? What are the trends in the industry? What customer expectations exist?  You use the answers to these questions to build a customer journey map that will help you execute the vision, as well as lead the transformation. It’s one thing to have a vision and articulate it to others, but you also have to capture it in a way that you can work on it, build on it, refine it and communicate it throughout the organization.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

It all starts with a vision. This is literally the most difficult aspect of a digital transformation and its importance shouldn’t be underestimated. You have to know where you want to go and who you want to be before attempting to make broad changes. 

Establishing and validating the vision is a process itself. It’s critical to understand where your vision fits in the market landscape. What are competitors doing? What are the trends in the industry? What customer expectations exist?  You use the answers to these questions to build a customer journey map that will help you execute the vision, as well as lead the transformation. It’s one thing to have a vision and articulate it to others, but you also have to capture it in a way that you can work on it, build on it, refine it and communicate it throughout the organization.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

boAt Nirvanaa Uno and Nirvanaa Duo in-ear earphones launched, available starting at Rs. 799

boAt, popular for its audio accessories has launched Nirvanaa UNO & DUO In-ear earphones in India. boAt Nirvanaa Uno In-ear Earphones feature 7mm drivers that promises perfectly balanced clear sound. It has Built Noise Isolation Mic with multifunction button. The boAt NIRVANAA DUO has dual 6mm dynamic drivers for deep detailed bass driven sound. The boAt Nirvanaa Uno is available on … Continue reading “boAt Nirvanaa Uno and Nirvanaa Duo in-ear earphones launched, available starting at Rs. 799”

boAt, popular for its audio accessories has launched Nirvanaa UNO & DUO In-ear earphones in India. boAt Nirvanaa Uno In-ear Earphones feature 7mm drivers that promises perfectly balanced clear sound. It has Built Noise Isolation Mic with multifunction button. The boAt NIRVANAA DUO has dual 6mm dynamic drivers for deep detailed bass driven sound. The boAt Nirvanaa Uno is available on … Continue reading "boAt Nirvanaa Uno and Nirvanaa Duo in-ear earphones launched, available starting at Rs. 799"

IDG Contributor Network: Stop before your employees drop

I was stunned by a recent headline about a Japanese woman who died from karoshi: death from overwork. The article reported that Miwa Sado, a 31-year-old journalist who was covering elections, logged 159 hours of overtime in just one month before succumbing to heart failure. The article went on to say more than 2,000 Japanese workers committed suicide because of work-related stress from January to March of 2016. It is amazing this story came from the same country that popularized the LEAN management system.

LEAN is not just a set of tools and methodologies such as Gemba Walks, Value Stream Mapping and Kaizen Events; it also embodies a management philosophy. One of the philosophical tenants of LEAN management is that good leaders must respect their employees by holding the dignity and well-being of every employee in high regard. Accordingly, grossly overworking ones employees is highly disrespectful of them. The quality of any company is derived from the quality of its people, and therefore employees are a company’s most important asset. When leaders hurt employees or allow them to be hurt, they inadvertently hurt the company. The damage is usually not discerned in the short run, but over time it does show up in error rates, customer defections, high turnover of the best and brightest employees, inefficient and ineffective processes that drive costs up and quality down, inability to attract the best talent, and the death or heavy curtailment of new ideas and innovation. Usually these problems never get linked back to leadership failure, and in fact are often addressed by blaming employees and cracking the accountability whip even harder. It is analogous to victimizing the victim.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

I was stunned by a recent headline about a Japanese woman who died from karoshi: death from overwork. The article reported that Miwa Sado, a 31-year-old journalist who was covering elections, logged 159 hours of overtime in just one month before succumbing to heart failure. The article went on to say more than 2,000 Japanese workers committed suicide because of work-related stress from January to March of 2016. It is amazing this story came from the same country that popularized the LEAN management system.

LEAN is not just a set of tools and methodologies such as Gemba Walks, Value Stream Mapping and Kaizen Events; it also embodies a management philosophy. One of the philosophical tenants of LEAN management is that good leaders must respect their employees by holding the dignity and well-being of every employee in high regard. Accordingly, grossly overworking ones employees is highly disrespectful of them. The quality of any company is derived from the quality of its people, and therefore employees are a company’s most important asset. When leaders hurt employees or allow them to be hurt, they inadvertently hurt the company. The damage is usually not discerned in the short run, but over time it does show up in error rates, customer defections, high turnover of the best and brightest employees, inefficient and ineffective processes that drive costs up and quality down, inability to attract the best talent, and the death or heavy curtailment of new ideas and innovation. Usually these problems never get linked back to leadership failure, and in fact are often addressed by blaming employees and cracking the accountability whip even harder. It is analogous to victimizing the victim.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Stop before your employees drop

I was stunned by a recent headline about a Japanese woman who died from karoshi: death from overwork. The article reported that Miwa Sado, a 31-year-old journalist who was covering elections, logged 159 hours of overtime in just one month before succumbing to heart failure. The article went on to say more than 2,000 Japanese workers committed suicide because of work-related stress from January to March of 2016. It is amazing this story came from the same country that popularized the LEAN management system.

LEAN is not just a set of tools and methodologies such as Gemba Walks, Value Stream Mapping and Kaizen Events; it also embodies a management philosophy. One of the philosophical tenants of LEAN management is that good leaders must respect their employees by holding the dignity and well-being of every employee in high regard. Accordingly, grossly overworking ones employees is highly disrespectful of them. The quality of any company is derived from the quality of its people, and therefore employees are a company’s most important asset. When leaders hurt employees or allow them to be hurt, they inadvertently hurt the company. The damage is usually not discerned in the short run, but over time it does show up in error rates, customer defections, high turnover of the best and brightest employees, inefficient and ineffective processes that drive costs up and quality down, inability to attract the best talent, and the death or heavy curtailment of new ideas and innovation. Usually these problems never get linked back to leadership failure, and in fact are often addressed by blaming employees and cracking the accountability whip even harder. It is analogous to victimizing the victim.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

I was stunned by a recent headline about a Japanese woman who died from karoshi: death from overwork. The article reported that Miwa Sado, a 31-year-old journalist who was covering elections, logged 159 hours of overtime in just one month before succumbing to heart failure. The article went on to say more than 2,000 Japanese workers committed suicide because of work-related stress from January to March of 2016. It is amazing this story came from the same country that popularized the LEAN management system.

LEAN is not just a set of tools and methodologies such as Gemba Walks, Value Stream Mapping and Kaizen Events; it also embodies a management philosophy. One of the philosophical tenants of LEAN management is that good leaders must respect their employees by holding the dignity and well-being of every employee in high regard. Accordingly, grossly overworking ones employees is highly disrespectful of them. The quality of any company is derived from the quality of its people, and therefore employees are a company’s most important asset. When leaders hurt employees or allow them to be hurt, they inadvertently hurt the company. The damage is usually not discerned in the short run, but over time it does show up in error rates, customer defections, high turnover of the best and brightest employees, inefficient and ineffective processes that drive costs up and quality down, inability to attract the best talent, and the death or heavy curtailment of new ideas and innovation. Usually these problems never get linked back to leadership failure, and in fact are often addressed by blaming employees and cracking the accountability whip even harder. It is analogous to victimizing the victim.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Leadership through the generations

There is a lot I don’t know. As new generations come of age taking on leadership roles, what I’m learning from Millennials is that they could be right. I may be wrong.

The old hierarchical dichotomy between teacher and student, or older mentor and younger mentee, worked well in a world where change happened slowly, and the knowledge of one generation could reasonably be transferred to the benefit of the next, like the Jedi powers – master transmitting perennial wisdom through the ages. But that just isn’t the case anymore – certainly not in IT. Top-down knowledge transfer doesn’t make sense in the dynamic, rapidly fluctuating world of technology where agile software development is educating robots right alongside us.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

There is a lot I don’t know. As new generations come of age taking on leadership roles, what I’m learning from Millennials is that they could be right. I may be wrong.

The old hierarchical dichotomy between teacher and student, or older mentor and younger mentee, worked well in a world where change happened slowly, and the knowledge of one generation could reasonably be transferred to the benefit of the next, like the Jedi powers – master transmitting perennial wisdom through the ages. But that just isn’t the case anymore – certainly not in IT. Top-down knowledge transfer doesn’t make sense in the dynamic, rapidly fluctuating world of technology where agile software development is educating robots right alongside us.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Leadership through the generations

There is a lot I don’t know. As new generations come of age taking on leadership roles, what I’m learning from Millennials is that they could be right. I may be wrong.

The old hierarchical dichotomy between teacher and student, or older mentor and younger mentee, worked well in a world where change happened slowly, and the knowledge of one generation could reasonably be transferred to the benefit of the next, like the Jedi powers – master transmitting perennial wisdom through the ages. But that just isn’t the case anymore – certainly not in IT. Top-down knowledge transfer doesn’t make sense in the dynamic, rapidly fluctuating world of technology where agile software development is educating robots right alongside us.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

There is a lot I don’t know. As new generations come of age taking on leadership roles, what I’m learning from Millennials is that they could be right. I may be wrong.

The old hierarchical dichotomy between teacher and student, or older mentor and younger mentee, worked well in a world where change happened slowly, and the knowledge of one generation could reasonably be transferred to the benefit of the next, like the Jedi powers – master transmitting perennial wisdom through the ages. But that just isn’t the case anymore – certainly not in IT. Top-down knowledge transfer doesn’t make sense in the dynamic, rapidly fluctuating world of technology where agile software development is educating robots right alongside us.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Sony Xperia R1 and Xperia R1 Plus launched in India for Rs. 12990 and Rs. 14990

Sony Mobile just launched Xperia R1 and Xperia R1 Plus, two new mid-range smartphones exclusively in India. Both these come with a 5.2-inch HD 2.5D curved glass screen, are powered by Snapdragon 430 Octa-Core SoC, run Android 7.1 (Nougat), which is upgradable to Android 8.0 (Oreo), come with a 13-megapixel rear camera with LED flash, Exmor and an … Continue reading “Sony Xperia R1 and Xperia R1 Plus launched in India for Rs. 12990 and Rs. 14990”

Sony Mobile just launched Xperia R1 and Xperia R1 Plus, two new mid-range smartphones exclusively in India. Both these come with a 5.2-inch HD 2.5D curved glass screen, are powered by Snapdragon 430 Octa-Core SoC, run Android 7.1 (Nougat), which is upgradable to Android 8.0 (Oreo), come with a 13-megapixel rear camera with LED flash, Exmor and an … Continue reading "Sony Xperia R1 and Xperia R1 Plus launched in India for Rs. 12990 and Rs. 14990"