IDG Contributor Network: ICANN’s Whois service faces GDPR compliance challenges

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation went into effect on May 25.  Daniel Solove speaks for many when he described it as the most comprehensive and nuanced data protection regime in the world, providing for “individual rights such as the right to access one’s data, the right to request restrictions on data use, the right to be forgotten, and the right to data portability.”

However, the interpretation of GDPR by European data protection officials in the case of the Whois data bases has generated a genuine conflict with other important public values, including protecting the public from fraudsters, criminals, thieves and hackers.  As Associate Deputy Attorney General Sujit Raman recently said “if European data protection authorities interpret the GDPR such that public access to the WHOIS database is restricted or eliminated, public safety will suffer—including in Europe.”

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The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation went into effect on May 25.  Daniel Solove speaks for many when he described it as the most comprehensive and nuanced data protection regime in the world, providing for “individual rights such as the right to access one’s data, the right to request restrictions on data use, the right to be forgotten, and the right to data portability.”

However, the interpretation of GDPR by European data protection officials in the case of the Whois data bases has generated a genuine conflict with other important public values, including protecting the public from fraudsters, criminals, thieves and hackers.  As Associate Deputy Attorney General Sujit Raman recently said “if European data protection authorities interpret the GDPR such that public access to the WHOIS database is restricted or eliminated, public safety will suffer—including in Europe.”

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IDG Contributor Network: GDPR is a missed opportunity for real privacy protection

The European Union’s well-publicized General Data Protection Regulation that went into force on May 25 is a much-needed update to its 1995 Data Protection Directive and in many ways a substantial improvement.  As leading privacy scholar Daniel Solove says it provides a “blueprint for protecting data that is more thorough and complete than nearly any other privacy law…”

Unfortunately, it did not update its core premise of protecting privacy through a right of individuals to control their own data.   

To read this article in full, please click here

The European Union’s well-publicized General Data Protection Regulation that went into force on May 25 is a much-needed update to its 1995 Data Protection Directive and in many ways a substantial improvement.  As leading privacy scholar Daniel Solove says it provides a “blueprint for protecting data that is more thorough and complete than nearly any other privacy law…”

Unfortunately, it did not update its core premise of protecting privacy through a right of individuals to control their own data.   

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: China and the West are converging on consumer data protection policy

The escalating economic and political tensions between China and the U.S have obscured a surprising and largely unrecognized area of convergence.  China is moving toward the West on consumer data protection policy.

A recent op ed piece in FT summed up the prevalent, but mistaken, idea that “privacy simply isn’t an issue in China.” Baidu’s Robin Li also reflected this erroneous view with his recent comment that “the Chinese people are more open or less sensitive about the privacy issue.” This cultural difference is supposed to give China an advantage over more privacy-protective regimes in developing cutting edge technologies like artificial intelligence.

To read this article in full, please click here

The escalating economic and political tensions between China and the U.S have obscured a surprising and largely unrecognized area of convergence.  China is moving toward the West on consumer data protection policy.

A recent op ed piece in FT summed up the prevalent, but mistaken, idea that “privacy simply isn’t an issue in China.” Baidu’s Robin Li also reflected this erroneous view with his recent comment that “the Chinese people are more open or less sensitive about the privacy issue.” This cultural difference is supposed to give China an advantage over more privacy-protective regimes in developing cutting edge technologies like artificial intelligence.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: China and the West are converging on consumer data protection policy

The escalating economic and political tensions between China and the U.S have obscured a surprising and largely unrecognized area of convergence.  China is moving toward the West on consumer data protection policy.

A recent op ed piece in FT summed up the prevalent, but mistaken, idea that “privacy simply isn’t an issue in China.” Baidu’s Robin Li also reflected this erroneous view with his recent comment that “the Chinese people are more open or less sensitive about the privacy issue.” This cultural difference is supposed to give China an advantage over more privacy-protective regimes in developing cutting edge technologies like artificial intelligence.

To read this article in full, please click here

The escalating economic and political tensions between China and the U.S have obscured a surprising and largely unrecognized area of convergence.  China is moving toward the West on consumer data protection policy.

A recent op ed piece in FT summed up the prevalent, but mistaken, idea that “privacy simply isn’t an issue in China.” Baidu’s Robin Li also reflected this erroneous view with his recent comment that “the Chinese people are more open or less sensitive about the privacy issue.” This cultural difference is supposed to give China an advantage over more privacy-protective regimes in developing cutting edge technologies like artificial intelligence.

To read this article in full, please click here