IDG Contributor Network: 2 trends reshaping the future of IT support

I traveled last week to Las Vegas to try to answer what may become a vital question for an entire sector of the technology industry: is there a future in providing technology support?

In the MGM Conference Center, over 2,300 service desk analysts and other technology support professionals gathered for HDI’s service and support conference. And as they did, this question — both spoken and unspoken — lingered just beneath the surface.

As conversations about chatbots, artificial intelligence (AI) and other forms of automation swirled about the expo floor and mixed with talk about the shifting role of support, the question about the future of this space became both relevant and timely.

To read this article in full, please click here

I traveled last week to Las Vegas to try to answer what may become a vital question for an entire sector of the technology industry: is there a future in providing technology support?

In the MGM Conference Center, over 2,300 service desk analysts and other technology support professionals gathered for HDI’s service and support conference. And as they did, this question — both spoken and unspoken — lingered just beneath the surface.

As conversations about chatbots, artificial intelligence (AI) and other forms of automation swirled about the expo floor and mixed with talk about the shifting role of support, the question about the future of this space became both relevant and timely.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 2 trends reshaping the future of IT support

I traveled last week to Las Vegas to try to answer what may become a vital question for an entire sector of the technology industry: is there a future in providing technology support?

In the MGM Conference Center, over 2,300 service desk analysts and other technology support professionals gathered for HDI’s service and support conference. And as they did, this question — both spoken and unspoken — lingered just beneath the surface.

As conversations about chatbots, artificial intelligence (AI) and other forms of automation swirled about the expo floor and mixed with talk about the shifting role of support, the question about the future of this space became both relevant and timely.

To read this article in full, please click here

I traveled last week to Las Vegas to try to answer what may become a vital question for an entire sector of the technology industry: is there a future in providing technology support?

In the MGM Conference Center, over 2,300 service desk analysts and other technology support professionals gathered for HDI’s service and support conference. And as they did, this question — both spoken and unspoken — lingered just beneath the surface.

As conversations about chatbots, artificial intelligence (AI) and other forms of automation swirled about the expo floor and mixed with talk about the shifting role of support, the question about the future of this space became both relevant and timely.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Why the customer experience is the future of monitoring

From the earliest days of the modern computing era, IT and business leaders understood that once you deployed technology to run an important part of the business, you needed some way of monitoring and managing that technology.

There’s been a robust market for monitoring solutions ever since.

As the technology stack became more complex and as organizations deployed technology in ever-more critical functions, the relative importance of monitoring solutions continued to rise. It was a simple equation: new technologies begat new monitoring solutions.

More recently, however, there has been a shift in this dynamic.

As digital transformation has taken root across the enterprise landscape, organizations are realizing that merely monitoring infrastructure and applications is not enough as they seek to enhance the customer experience and create organizational agility across every dimension of their now-critical technology stack.

To read this article in full, please click here

From the earliest days of the modern computing era, IT and business leaders understood that once you deployed technology to run an important part of the business, you needed some way of monitoring and managing that technology.

There’s been a robust market for monitoring solutions ever since.

As the technology stack became more complex and as organizations deployed technology in ever-more critical functions, the relative importance of monitoring solutions continued to rise. It was a simple equation: new technologies begat new monitoring solutions.

More recently, however, there has been a shift in this dynamic.

As digital transformation has taken root across the enterprise landscape, organizations are realizing that merely monitoring infrastructure and applications is not enough as they seek to enhance the customer experience and create organizational agility across every dimension of their now-critical technology stack.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: IBM bets big on the ‘incumbent disruptor’

Since its inception, IBM has bet on the big enterprise. A stalwart of the industrial age, IBM provided much of the technology its industrial counterparts needed as they embraced the first computer era — and has maintained a significant presence within enterprise organizations ever since.

As technologies evolved, IBM went through its ups-and-downs as it adapted to changing enterprise needs and appetites, but its focus on meeting the big needs of the big enterprise never wavered.

Over the last decade, however, IBM’s enterprise customers have been under assault.  Nimble, disruptive start-ups have used their willingness to experiment with new technologies and business models to unsettle and unseat their slower-moving and risk-averse enterprise competitors.

To read this article in full, please click here

Since its inception, IBM has bet on the big enterprise. A stalwart of the industrial age, IBM provided much of the technology its industrial counterparts needed as they embraced the first computer era — and has maintained a significant presence within enterprise organizations ever since.

As technologies evolved, IBM went through its ups-and-downs as it adapted to changing enterprise needs and appetites, but its focus on meeting the big needs of the big enterprise never wavered.

Over the last decade, however, IBM’s enterprise customers have been under assault.  Nimble, disruptive start-ups have used their willingness to experiment with new technologies and business models to unsettle and unseat their slower-moving and risk-averse enterprise competitors.

To read this article in full, please click here