IDG Contributor Network: What’s disrupting supply chain and procurement?

Digital technologies are impacting specific industries, both through internal change and competitive threats. In “How to jumpstart digital transformation in healthcare,” I proposed a healthcare IT transformation strategy. But these forces also are transforming standard business functions, such as finance, marketing and HR. Also undergoing transformation are the key areas of supply chain and procurement.

Like many business processes, supply chain and procurement have their own inertia. A case in point is the persistence of the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) protocol. “EDI is Dead! Long Live EDI!” That was the title of an Industry Week article from 2004, yet it could still apply today.

To read this article in full, please click here

Digital technologies are impacting specific industries, both through internal change and competitive threats. In "How to jumpstart digital transformation in healthcare," I proposed a healthcare IT transformation strategy. But these forces also are transforming standard business functions, such as finance, marketing and HR. Also undergoing transformation are the key areas of supply chain and procurement.

Like many business processes, supply chain and procurement have their own inertia. A case in point is the persistence of the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) protocol. “EDI is Dead! Long Live EDI!” That was the title of an Industry Week article from 2004, yet it could still apply today.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: What’s disrupting supply chain and procurement?

Digital technologies are impacting specific industries, both through internal change and competitive threats. In “How to jumpstart digital transformation in healthcare,” I proposed a healthcare IT transformation strategy. But these forces also are transforming standard business functions, such as finance, marketing and HR. Also undergoing transformation are the key areas of supply chain and procurement.

Like many business processes, supply chain and procurement have their own inertia. A case in point is the persistence of the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) protocol. “EDI is Dead! Long Live EDI!” That was the title of an Industry Week article from 2004, yet it could still apply today.

To read this article in full, please click here

Digital technologies are impacting specific industries, both through internal change and competitive threats. In "How to jumpstart digital transformation in healthcare," I proposed a healthcare IT transformation strategy. But these forces also are transforming standard business functions, such as finance, marketing and HR. Also undergoing transformation are the key areas of supply chain and procurement.

Like many business processes, supply chain and procurement have their own inertia. A case in point is the persistence of the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) protocol. “EDI is Dead! Long Live EDI!” That was the title of an Industry Week article from 2004, yet it could still apply today.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How to jumpstart digital transformation in healthcare

Every industry assumes a distinctive culture, which in turn influences the kind of IT infrastructure that supports it. Healthcare is no exception. Led by medical professionals, dedicated to patient care and insulated from common market dynamics, healthcare self-consciously stands apart. The impact on IT is a dichotomy: at best, it leads to shared industry knowledge; at worst, to insularity and resistance to change.

But external factors – regulation, competition and technology – are combining to make resistance more futile. That’s putting healthcare provider CIOs in a difficult situation.

“After years of successfully implementing systems to meet regulatory requirements, half of them are not sure what to do next,” says Doug Smith, general manager of the WGroup, a peer-led IT management consulting firm, and former CIO of the Cleveland Clinic. “They say, ‘I have all this technology debt, my team’s skills are limited, our engagement model is broken, and funding is drying up.’ They are being forced to make some tough decisions.” (Disclosure: the company I work for, NTT Communications, partners with WGroup in healthcare and other industries.)

To read this article in full, please click here

Every industry assumes a distinctive culture, which in turn influences the kind of IT infrastructure that supports it. Healthcare is no exception. Led by medical professionals, dedicated to patient care and insulated from common market dynamics, healthcare self-consciously stands apart. The impact on IT is a dichotomy: at best, it leads to shared industry knowledge; at worst, to insularity and resistance to change.

But external factors – regulation, competition and technology – are combining to make resistance more futile. That’s putting healthcare provider CIOs in a difficult situation.

“After years of successfully implementing systems to meet regulatory requirements, half of them are not sure what to do next,” says Doug Smith, general manager of the WGroup, a peer-led IT management consulting firm, and former CIO of the Cleveland Clinic. “They say, ‘I have all this technology debt, my team’s skills are limited, our engagement model is broken, and funding is drying up.’ They are being forced to make some tough decisions.” (Disclosure: the company I work for, NTT Communications, partners with WGroup in healthcare and other industries.)

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How to jumpstart digital transformation in healthcare

Every industry assumes a distinctive culture, which in turn influences the kind of IT infrastructure that supports it. Healthcare is no exception. Led by medical professionals, dedicated to patient care and insulated from common market dynamics, healthcare self-consciously stands apart. The impact on IT is a dichotomy: at best, it leads to shared industry knowledge; at worst, to insularity and resistance to change.

But external factors – regulation, competition and technology – are combining to make resistance more futile. That’s putting healthcare provider CIOs in a difficult situation.

“After years of successfully implementing systems to meet regulatory requirements, half of them are not sure what to do next,” says Doug Smith, general manager of the WGroup, a peer-led IT management consulting firm, and former CIO of the Cleveland Clinic. “They say, ‘I have all this technology debt, my team’s skills are limited, our engagement model is broken, and funding is drying up.’ They are being forced to make some tough decisions.” (Disclosure: the company I work for, NTT Communications, partners with WGroup in healthcare and other industries.)

To read this article in full, please click here

Every industry assumes a distinctive culture, which in turn influences the kind of IT infrastructure that supports it. Healthcare is no exception. Led by medical professionals, dedicated to patient care and insulated from common market dynamics, healthcare self-consciously stands apart. The impact on IT is a dichotomy: at best, it leads to shared industry knowledge; at worst, to insularity and resistance to change.

But external factors – regulation, competition and technology – are combining to make resistance more futile. That’s putting healthcare provider CIOs in a difficult situation.

“After years of successfully implementing systems to meet regulatory requirements, half of them are not sure what to do next,” says Doug Smith, general manager of the WGroup, a peer-led IT management consulting firm, and former CIO of the Cleveland Clinic. “They say, ‘I have all this technology debt, my team’s skills are limited, our engagement model is broken, and funding is drying up.’ They are being forced to make some tough decisions.” (Disclosure: the company I work for, NTT Communications, partners with WGroup in healthcare and other industries.)

To read this article in full, please click here