BrandPost: Security-By-Design: The Mantra for Securing IoT

IBM and IDG Content

Smart thermostats, autonomous vehicles, wind turbine farms—these are among the myriad products and commercial assets rapidly being linked to the Internet of Things (IoT). While this universe of “connected things” is sparking new experiences and business models, it’s also opened up a raft of security challenges that many IT organizations aren’t fully equipped to deal with.

The installed base of IoT-enabled devices is forecast to grow to almost 31 billion worldwide by 2020 and soar to 75.4 billion by 2025, according to industry estimates. Protocols for safeguarding IoT devices are similar to enterprise IT security practices—authentication, authorization, encryption and decryption, data integrity, and key management, among others. But the new frontier also introduces additional considerations, as there are a wider range of device types operating in a less controlled environment with an expanded attack surface.

To read this article in full, please click here

IBM and IDG Content

Smart thermostats, autonomous vehicles, wind turbine farms—these are among the myriad products and commercial assets rapidly being linked to the Internet of Things (IoT). While this universe of “connected things” is sparking new experiences and business models, it’s also opened up a raft of security challenges that many IT organizations aren’t fully equipped to deal with.

The installed base of IoT-enabled devices is forecast to grow to almost 31 billion worldwide by 2020 and soar to 75.4 billion by 2025, according to industry estimates. Protocols for safeguarding IoT devices are similar to enterprise IT security practices—authentication, authorization, encryption and decryption, data integrity, and key management, among others. But the new frontier also introduces additional considerations, as there are a wider range of device types operating in a less controlled environment with an expanded attack surface.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Marrying Security Analytics and Artificial Intelligence

IBM and IDG Content

It’s hard to remember a time when cyber-based security threats were so few and far between that they could be easily identified and countered by well-trained IT security experts. Today, the volume and diversity of potential threats long ago outstripped the ability of human professionals to evaluate them unaided. Today, security pros rely heavily on a multiplicity of highly automated threat intelligence feeds and analytical systems.

Still, even sophisticated security incident and event management (SIEM) solutions can struggle to separate actual cyber threats from the millions – if not billions – of potentially relevant IT and networking events that even moderate-sized organizations log each day. To increase their odds of success, SIEM systems and other security monitoring and analytics tools are increasingly turning to a variety of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies.

To read this article in full, please click here

IBM and IDG Content

It’s hard to remember a time when cyber-based security threats were so few and far between that they could be easily identified and countered by well-trained IT security experts. Today, the volume and diversity of potential threats long ago outstripped the ability of human professionals to evaluate them unaided. Today, security pros rely heavily on a multiplicity of highly automated threat intelligence feeds and analytical systems.

Still, even sophisticated security incident and event management (SIEM) solutions can struggle to separate actual cyber threats from the millions – if not billions – of potentially relevant IT and networking events that even moderate-sized organizations log each day. To increase their odds of success, SIEM systems and other security monitoring and analytics tools are increasingly turning to a variety of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Protecting Your Data in Enterprise Cloud Computing Agreements

Tech buyers often misunderstand contract terms about data. So they don’t protect themselves in agreements about software-as-a-service and other types of cloud computing. I see the resulting weak contracts in my work as a lawyer, and I teach businesspeople and lawyers to do better in my courses on tech contracts. One of the key lessons is: “Ask better questions.” This article offers questions you should ask about your data—questions for your lawyer, contract manager, vendor, or for yourself.

1. Does the contract say we own our data? How useful is that?

Most cloud contracts confirm your ownership of data in loud and clear language: “Customer owns all right, title, and interest in the Data.” That’s great, and you do want those terms. But when it comes to data, ownership isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

To read this article in full, please click here

Tech buyers often misunderstand contract terms about data. So they don’t protect themselves in agreements about software-as-a-service and other types of cloud computing. I see the resulting weak contracts in my work as a lawyer, and I teach businesspeople and lawyers to do better in my courses on tech contracts. One of the key lessons is: “Ask better questions.” This article offers questions you should ask about your data—questions for your lawyer, contract manager, vendor, or for yourself.

1. Does the contract say we own our data? How useful is that?

Most cloud contracts confirm your ownership of data in loud and clear language: “Customer owns all right, title, and interest in the Data.” That’s great, and you do want those terms. But when it comes to data, ownership isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Filling Critical Security Gaps with Cloud-Based Services

IBM and IDG Content

Cloud computing, once a top security concern among IT and security leaders, is increasingly seen as a critical ally. Beset by rapidly evolving cybersecurity threats and a shortage of security expertise, growing numbers of organizations are turning to cloud-based security services to better protect their data, systems, applications, and network.

Today, most of the same security tools and technologies that companies can deploy and operate on-premises are also available as cloud services – sometimes called Security-as-a-Service (SecaaS) – although certain solutions are only available in the cloud.

Companies turn to the cloud to help with cybersecurity needs for a variety of reasons. Among the most important:

To read this article in full, please click here

IBM and IDG Content

Cloud computing, once a top security concern among IT and security leaders, is increasingly seen as a critical ally. Beset by rapidly evolving cybersecurity threats and a shortage of security expertise, growing numbers of organizations are turning to cloud-based security services to better protect their data, systems, applications, and network.

Today, most of the same security tools and technologies that companies can deploy and operate on-premises are also available as cloud services – sometimes called Security-as-a-Service (SecaaS) – although certain solutions are only available in the cloud.

Companies turn to the cloud to help with cybersecurity needs for a variety of reasons. Among the most important:

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Comparison: Azure Site Recovery as a Best Disaster Recovery Tool?

Even though we often hear about IT disasters in the news, many organizations still do not believe that an IT disaster can hit them. As a result, they are inadequately prepared for one.

The truth is, IT disasters strike everyone – sooner or later. In fact, in today’s world, it’s not a matter of if an IT disaster will strike, but when. Per a 2014 survey done by the Disaster Recovery Preparedness Council, 73% of organizations consider themselves to be failing in terms of disaster readiness. In particular, small businesses typically believe that disaster preparedness strategies are only needed for enterprise-scale IT budgets.

To read this article in full, please click here

Even though we often hear about IT disasters in the news, many organizations still do not believe that an IT disaster can hit them. As a result, they are inadequately prepared for one.

The truth is, IT disasters strike everyone – sooner or later. In fact, in today’s world, it’s not a matter of if an IT disaster will strike, but when. Per a 2014 survey done by the Disaster Recovery Preparedness Council, 73% of organizations consider themselves to be failing in terms of disaster readiness. In particular, small businesses typically believe that disaster preparedness strategies are only needed for enterprise-scale IT budgets.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Why HPC Matters: Making the World a Safer Place

In today’s data-driven world, our national security increasingly depends on high-performance computing systems and machine learning technologies that churn through massive amounts of data to identify potential threats, even in real time.

Just consider this example from a trio of experts writing in The Washington Post: “Big data is a ‘big deal’ for U.S. spy agencies, which have long relied on multiple data sources to produce intelligence reports,” the paper noted in a 2017 article. “In the past decade, agencies like the CIA and the NSA have institutionalized big data through the development of dedicated analytics units and research and development projects focusing on the analysis of online data such as YouTube videos and social media posts.”1

To read this article in full, please click here

In today’s data-driven world, our national security increasingly depends on high-performance computing systems and machine learning technologies that churn through massive amounts of data to identify potential threats, even in real time.

Just consider this example from a trio of experts writing in The Washington Post: “Big data is a ‘big deal’ for U.S. spy agencies, which have long relied on multiple data sources to produce intelligence reports,” the paper noted in a 2017 article. “In the past decade, agencies like the CIA and the NSA have institutionalized big data through the development of dedicated analytics units and research and development projects focusing on the analysis of online data such as YouTube videos and social media posts.”1

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: How to Close the Patch Gap

  • A majority of cyberattack victims say their breaches could have been prevented by installing patches
  • Most companies don’t have the resources to keep up with all the patches they need to install
  • Companies can reduce the burden on staffers by automating the patch process

Updating software to install the latest security features sounds relatively easy if you’re talking about a laptop or a phone. You simply download an update, wait around for a little while, and the patch is applied with little to no effort on your part.

Patching enterprise software is vastly more complex and a growing risk for companies of almost every size and type. Unpatched business systems are a gold mine for hackers seeking to steal data or hold it hostage. It’s one of the main causes of what Accenture estimates were $21 billion in cybercrime‑related losses to U.S. companies in 2017.

To read this article in full, please click here

  • A majority of cyberattack victims say their breaches could have been prevented by installing patches
  • Most companies don’t have the resources to keep up with all the patches they need to install
  • Companies can reduce the burden on staffers by automating the patch process

Updating software to install the latest security features sounds relatively easy if you’re talking about a laptop or a phone. You simply download an update, wait around for a little while, and the patch is applied with little to no effort on your part.

Patching enterprise software is vastly more complex and a growing risk for companies of almost every size and type. Unpatched business systems are a gold mine for hackers seeking to steal data or hold it hostage. It’s one of the main causes of what Accenture estimates were $21 billion in cybercrime‑related losses to U.S. companies in 2017.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: What Do Businesses Really Think About Data Analytics, Algorithms, and Machine Learning?

In March 2018, Dell EMC surveyed 315 IT executives, in primarily mid-size and enterprise organizations across a wide range of industries, to investigate various issues around the current and future use of use of data analytics, predictive analytics, and machine learning. Findings reveal insights into:

  • General satisfaction with data analytics activities
  • Interest in automation for predictive analytics
  • Key benefits and deterrents associated with the use of machine learning

While more than a third of respondents say their organizations use big data/analytics (46%), predictive analytics (39%), algorithms (36%), and automated action triggered by algorithms (38%), the majority of companies have yet to embrace these technologies. It’s not that they’re not thinking about it, however. A full 28%-30% of respondents report that their organizations are either testing or considering each activity.

To read this article in full, please click here

In March 2018, Dell EMC surveyed 315 IT executives, in primarily mid-size and enterprise organizations across a wide range of industries, to investigate various issues around the current and future use of use of data analytics, predictive analytics, and machine learning. Findings reveal insights into:

  • General satisfaction with data analytics activities
  • Interest in automation for predictive analytics
  • Key benefits and deterrents associated with the use of machine learning

While more than a third of respondents say their organizations use big data/analytics (46%), predictive analytics (39%), algorithms (36%), and automated action triggered by algorithms (38%), the majority of companies have yet to embrace these technologies. It’s not that they’re not thinking about it, however. A full 28%-30% of respondents report that their organizations are either testing or considering each activity.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: How Big Data is Battling the Big C

I shouldn’t be here. That’s the simple fact of the matter. At age 44, I was diagnosed with a very aggressive form of prostate cancer that had already reached Stage 4. The traditional “cut, burn, poison, starve” treatment approach bought me some time, although I paid for it in chemo sickness and lowered quality of life. When the cancer started growing again a year later, I had pretty much run out of options. Facing my own mortality, I decided to go back to work at Intel, transferring into the health and life sciences division in the hopes that I could make my final days count. It was a move that literally saved my life.

personalizedmedicine quote 2000x276

Bryce Olson, Global Marketing Director, Intel Health and Life Sciences

To read this article in full, please click here

I shouldn’t be here. That’s the simple fact of the matter. At age 44, I was diagnosed with a very aggressive form of prostate cancer that had already reached Stage 4. The traditional “cut, burn, poison, starve” treatment approach bought me some time, although I paid for it in chemo sickness and lowered quality of life. When the cancer started growing again a year later, I had pretty much run out of options. Facing my own mortality, I decided to go back to work at Intel, transferring into the health and life sciences division in the hopes that I could make my final days count. It was a move that literally saved my life.

personalizedmedicine quote 2000x276

Bryce Olson, Global Marketing Director, Intel Health and Life Sciences

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: How Big Data is Battling the Big C

I shouldn’t be here. That’s the simple fact of the matter. At age 44, I was diagnosed with a very aggressive form of prostate cancer that had already reached Stage 4. The traditional “cut, burn, poison, starve” treatment approach bought me some time, although I paid for it in chemo sickness and lowered quality of life. When the cancer started growing again a year later, I had pretty much run out of options. Facing my own mortality, I decided to go back to work at Intel, transferring into the health and life sciences division in the hopes that I could make my final days count. It was a move that literally saved my life.

personalizedmedicine quote 2000x276

Bryce Olson, Global Marketing Director, Intel Health and Life Sciences

To read this article in full, please click here

I shouldn’t be here. That’s the simple fact of the matter. At age 44, I was diagnosed with a very aggressive form of prostate cancer that had already reached Stage 4. The traditional “cut, burn, poison, starve” treatment approach bought me some time, although I paid for it in chemo sickness and lowered quality of life. When the cancer started growing again a year later, I had pretty much run out of options. Facing my own mortality, I decided to go back to work at Intel, transferring into the health and life sciences division in the hopes that I could make my final days count. It was a move that literally saved my life.

personalizedmedicine quote 2000x276

Bryce Olson, Global Marketing Director, Intel Health and Life Sciences

To read this article in full, please click here