BrandPost: The Future (And Reality) Of Autonomous Enterprise Software

by John Barnes

Oracle’s series of announcements about autonomous database technology – with the first real product being the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud launched on March 27 – has been declared a profound revolution, repackaged hype, and everything between. Oracle’s announcement has touched off a vigorous multi-sided debate on the forecast for software autonomy: its definition and financial imperatives, as well as the intertwined hype and truth about its performance and the limits (if any) of an autonomous-security arms race.

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by John Barnes

Oracle's series of announcements about autonomous database technology – with the first real product being the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud launched on March 27 – has been declared a profound revolution, repackaged hype, and everything between. Oracle's announcement has touched off a vigorous multi-sided debate on the forecast for software autonomy: its definition and financial imperatives, as well as the intertwined hype and truth about its performance and the limits (if any) of an autonomous-security arms race.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: The Future (And Reality) Of Autonomous Enterprise Software

by John Barnes

Oracle’s series of announcements about autonomous database technology – with the first real product being the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud launched on March 27 – has been declared a profound revolution, repackaged hype, and everything between. Oracle’s announcement has touched off a vigorous multi-sided debate on the forecast for software autonomy: its definition and financial imperatives, as well as the intertwined hype and truth about its performance and the limits (if any) of an autonomous-security arms race.

To read this article in full, please click here

by John Barnes

Oracle's series of announcements about autonomous database technology – with the first real product being the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud launched on March 27 – has been declared a profound revolution, repackaged hype, and everything between. Oracle's announcement has touched off a vigorous multi-sided debate on the forecast for software autonomy: its definition and financial imperatives, as well as the intertwined hype and truth about its performance and the limits (if any) of an autonomous-security arms race.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Driving M&A Integration to Completion

Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity across the world has hit a 17-year-record high in the first quarter of 2018, according to a report by research firm Mergermarket. That growth is expected to increase, as corporate tax reductions in the United States fuel a number of growth investments, including M&A.

Common deal structures (i.e., acquisition of like entities, carve-out and integration of like operating units) come with the expectations of integrating the acquired entity(ies) into the acquiring company’s operations. These deals create challenges for the IT organization, which must simultaneously “keep the lights on” in the legacy organization while integrating the acquired organization and evolving the integrated IT organization to support the expanded entity. These efforts can take a significant amount of time, so companies can be tempted to conclude formal integration activities before the “long tail” of IT integration is complete.

To read this article in full, please click here

Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity across the world has hit a 17-year-record high in the first quarter of 2018, according to a report by research firm Mergermarket. That growth is expected to increase, as corporate tax reductions in the United States fuel a number of growth investments, including M&A.

Common deal structures (i.e., acquisition of like entities, carve-out and integration of like operating units) come with the expectations of integrating the acquired entity(ies) into the acquiring company’s operations. These deals create challenges for the IT organization, which must simultaneously “keep the lights on” in the legacy organization while integrating the acquired organization and evolving the integrated IT organization to support the expanded entity. These efforts can take a significant amount of time, so companies can be tempted to conclude formal integration activities before the “long tail” of IT integration is complete.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Driving M&A Integration to Completion

Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity across the world has hit a 17-year-record high in the first quarter of 2018, according to a report by research firm Mergermarket. That growth is expected to increase, as corporate tax reductions in the United States fuel a number of growth investments, including M&A.

Common deal structures (i.e., acquisition of like entities, carve-out and integration of like operating units) come with the expectations of integrating the acquired entity(ies) into the acquiring company’s operations. These deals create challenges for the IT organization, which must simultaneously “keep the lights on” in the legacy organization while integrating the acquired organization and evolving the integrated IT organization to support the expanded entity. These efforts can take a significant amount of time, so companies can be tempted to conclude formal integration activities before the “long tail” of IT integration is complete.

To read this article in full, please click here

Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity across the world has hit a 17-year-record high in the first quarter of 2018, according to a report by research firm Mergermarket. That growth is expected to increase, as corporate tax reductions in the United States fuel a number of growth investments, including M&A.

Common deal structures (i.e., acquisition of like entities, carve-out and integration of like operating units) come with the expectations of integrating the acquired entity(ies) into the acquiring company’s operations. These deals create challenges for the IT organization, which must simultaneously “keep the lights on” in the legacy organization while integrating the acquired organization and evolving the integrated IT organization to support the expanded entity. These efforts can take a significant amount of time, so companies can be tempted to conclude formal integration activities before the “long tail” of IT integration is complete.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: The Future of Computing Is Bigger Than the Cloud

By Dean Alms

The importance of cloud computing is almost impossible to overstate. Already, new companies set themselves to run almost entirely on cloud software, while many established firms are adopting it selectively but aggressively.

Despite that, the future of business computing is bigger than the cloud. Not every traditional software system will prove to have an equally robust Software-as-a Service replacement, nor will every essential system prove to be worth rearchitecting for the cloud.

Now this is where the terminology gets tricky. I prefer to speak in terms of cloud software versus traditionally licensed software, as opposed to cloud software versus “on premises” software.  A lot of traditionally licensed software has been run on a licensee’s premises – and by that we can mean a server room down the hall, a licensee’s owned or leased remote data center, and even one run for the licensee under contract by a managed service provider. These days, that might even include “cloud hosting” arrangements, so the terminology can be muddy. Some cloud hosting arrangements can allow you to “lift and shift” existing systems, even complex ones such as ERPs, into their environment, essentially unchanged. That can have cost and performance advantages, but despite the overlapping terminology, cloud hosting is not the same as making an application cloud native.

To read this article in full, please click here

By Dean Alms

The importance of cloud computing is almost impossible to overstate. Already, new companies set themselves to run almost entirely on cloud software, while many established firms are adopting it selectively but aggressively.

Despite that, the future of business computing is bigger than the cloud. Not every traditional software system will prove to have an equally robust Software-as-a Service replacement, nor will every essential system prove to be worth rearchitecting for the cloud.

Now this is where the terminology gets tricky. I prefer to speak in terms of cloud software versus traditionally licensed software, as opposed to cloud software versus “on premises” software.  A lot of traditionally licensed software has been run on a licensee’s premises – and by that we can mean a server room down the hall, a licensee’s owned or leased remote data center, and even one run for the licensee under contract by a managed service provider. These days, that might even include “cloud hosting” arrangements, so the terminology can be muddy. Some cloud hosting arrangements can allow you to “lift and shift” existing systems, even complex ones such as ERPs, into their environment, essentially unchanged. That can have cost and performance advantages, but despite the overlapping terminology, cloud hosting is not the same as making an application cloud native.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: The Future of Computing Is Bigger Than the Cloud

By Dean Alms

The importance of cloud computing is almost impossible to overstate. Already, new companies set themselves to run almost entirely on cloud software, while many established firms are adopting it selectively but aggressively.

Despite that, the future of business computing is bigger than the cloud. Not every traditional software system will prove to have an equally robust Software-as-a Service replacement, nor will every essential system prove to be worth rearchitecting for the cloud.

Now this is where the terminology gets tricky. I prefer to speak in terms of cloud software versus traditionally licensed software, as opposed to cloud software versus “on premises” software.  A lot of traditionally licensed software has been run on a licensee’s premises – and by that we can mean a server room down the hall, a licensee’s owned or leased remote data center, and even one run for the licensee under contract by a managed service provider. These days, that might even include “cloud hosting” arrangements, so the terminology can be muddy. Some cloud hosting arrangements can allow you to “lift and shift” existing systems, even complex ones such as ERPs, into their environment, essentially unchanged. That can have cost and performance advantages, but despite the overlapping terminology, cloud hosting is not the same as making an application cloud native.

To read this article in full, please click here

By Dean Alms

The importance of cloud computing is almost impossible to overstate. Already, new companies set themselves to run almost entirely on cloud software, while many established firms are adopting it selectively but aggressively.

Despite that, the future of business computing is bigger than the cloud. Not every traditional software system will prove to have an equally robust Software-as-a Service replacement, nor will every essential system prove to be worth rearchitecting for the cloud.

Now this is where the terminology gets tricky. I prefer to speak in terms of cloud software versus traditionally licensed software, as opposed to cloud software versus “on premises” software.  A lot of traditionally licensed software has been run on a licensee’s premises – and by that we can mean a server room down the hall, a licensee’s owned or leased remote data center, and even one run for the licensee under contract by a managed service provider. These days, that might even include “cloud hosting” arrangements, so the terminology can be muddy. Some cloud hosting arrangements can allow you to “lift and shift” existing systems, even complex ones such as ERPs, into their environment, essentially unchanged. That can have cost and performance advantages, but despite the overlapping terminology, cloud hosting is not the same as making an application cloud native.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: 3 Ways to Boost Organizational Speed

In physics, centripetal force is the law of motion that helps an object safely negotiate a corner.  Railroad engineers and race car drivers live and die by this law, and if they pick up too much speed, the consequences can be catastrophic.

Business has its own laws of motion, and though excessive speed may not lead to loss of life, the consequences can be just as real. Despite this, recent survey results suggest that many companies have thrown caution to the wind in an effort to stay competitive.

Earlier this year, security company Threat Stack released findings that show 52%of companies have cut back on cybersecurity practices in order to meet deadlines or business objectives. And a Nielsen State of Innovation survey found that 84% of fast-moving consumer goods manufacturers are feeling pressure to get to market faster — and most say that’s at the expense of innovation.  According to Jenny Frazier, SVP in Nielsen’s Innovation practice, when speed is a priority, 78% of marketers reduce the time they spend on innovation.

To read this article in full, please click here

In physics, centripetal force is the law of motion that helps an object safely negotiate a corner.  Railroad engineers and race car drivers live and die by this law, and if they pick up too much speed, the consequences can be catastrophic.

Business has its own laws of motion, and though excessive speed may not lead to loss of life, the consequences can be just as real. Despite this, recent survey results suggest that many companies have thrown caution to the wind in an effort to stay competitive.

Earlier this year, security company Threat Stack released findings that show 52%of companies have cut back on cybersecurity practices in order to meet deadlines or business objectives. And a Nielsen State of Innovation survey found that 84% of fast-moving consumer goods manufacturers are feeling pressure to get to market faster — and most say that’s at the expense of innovation.  According to Jenny Frazier, SVP in Nielsen’s Innovation practice, when speed is a priority, 78% of marketers reduce the time they spend on innovation.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: 3 Ways to Boost Organizational Speed

In physics, centripetal force is the law of motion that helps an object safely negotiate a corner.  Railroad engineers and race car drivers live and die by this law, and if they pick up too much speed, the consequences can be catastrophic.

Business has its own laws of motion, and though excessive speed may not lead to loss of life, the consequences can be just as real. Despite this, recent survey results suggest that many companies have thrown caution to the wind in an effort to stay competitive.

Earlier this year, security company Threat Stack released findings that show 52%of companies have cut back on cybersecurity practices in order to meet deadlines or business objectives. And a Nielsen State of Innovation survey found that 84% of fast-moving consumer goods manufacturers are feeling pressure to get to market faster — and most say that’s at the expense of innovation.  According to Jenny Frazier, SVP in Nielsen’s Innovation practice, when speed is a priority, 78% of marketers reduce the time they spend on innovation.

To read this article in full, please click here

In physics, centripetal force is the law of motion that helps an object safely negotiate a corner.  Railroad engineers and race car drivers live and die by this law, and if they pick up too much speed, the consequences can be catastrophic.

Business has its own laws of motion, and though excessive speed may not lead to loss of life, the consequences can be just as real. Despite this, recent survey results suggest that many companies have thrown caution to the wind in an effort to stay competitive.

Earlier this year, security company Threat Stack released findings that show 52%of companies have cut back on cybersecurity practices in order to meet deadlines or business objectives. And a Nielsen State of Innovation survey found that 84% of fast-moving consumer goods manufacturers are feeling pressure to get to market faster — and most say that’s at the expense of innovation.  According to Jenny Frazier, SVP in Nielsen’s Innovation practice, when speed is a priority, 78% of marketers reduce the time they spend on innovation.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: The Power of Partnering for Procurement

There is no shortage of software options when it comes to sourcing and procurement (S&P). Many enterprises have seen their ERP footprint expand to include procurement, while other businesses have assembled an array of independent software products to handle procure-to-pay (P2P), vendor contract management, creation of purchase orders, and accounts payable functionality.

With enterprises increasingly turning to the cloud for business and productivity workloads, procurement data often becomes siloed, either on-premises in different applications, or between cloud and locally hosted applications that just don’t play together well.

But a tightly aligned, collaborative arrangement with a S&P provider can help alleviate these challenges. “A real partnership between businesses and their procurement provider can be very powerful,” says Paul Blake, Associate Director for GEP. “A partner with domain expertise in sourcing and procurement coupled with a ‘built-in-the-cloud’ software platform that can break down information silos can take a large burden off the CPO and the CIO.”

To read this article in full, please click here

There is no shortage of software options when it comes to sourcing and procurement (S&P). Many enterprises have seen their ERP footprint expand to include procurement, while other businesses have assembled an array of independent software products to handle procure-to-pay (P2P), vendor contract management, creation of purchase orders, and accounts payable functionality.

With enterprises increasingly turning to the cloud for business and productivity workloads, procurement data often becomes siloed, either on-premises in different applications, or between cloud and locally hosted applications that just don’t play together well.

But a tightly aligned, collaborative arrangement with a S&P provider can help alleviate these challenges. “A real partnership between businesses and their procurement provider can be very powerful,” says Paul Blake, Associate Director for GEP. “A partner with domain expertise in sourcing and procurement coupled with a ‘built-in-the-cloud’ software platform that can break down information silos can take a large burden off the CPO and the CIO.”

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: The Power of Partnering for Procurement

There is no shortage of software options when it comes to sourcing and procurement (S&P). Many enterprises have seen their ERP footprint expand to include procurement, while other businesses have assembled an array of independent software products to handle procure-to-pay (P2P), vendor contract management, creation of purchase orders, and accounts payable functionality.

With enterprises increasingly turning to the cloud for business and productivity workloads, procurement data often becomes siloed, either on-premises in different applications, or between cloud and locally hosted applications that just don’t play together well.

But a tightly aligned, collaborative arrangement with a S&P provider can help alleviate these challenges. “A real partnership between businesses and their procurement provider can be very powerful,” says Paul Blake, Associate Director for GEP. “A partner with domain expertise in sourcing and procurement coupled with a ‘built-in-the-cloud’ software platform that can break down information silos can take a large burden off the CPO and the CIO.”

To read this article in full, please click here

There is no shortage of software options when it comes to sourcing and procurement (S&P). Many enterprises have seen their ERP footprint expand to include procurement, while other businesses have assembled an array of independent software products to handle procure-to-pay (P2P), vendor contract management, creation of purchase orders, and accounts payable functionality.

With enterprises increasingly turning to the cloud for business and productivity workloads, procurement data often becomes siloed, either on-premises in different applications, or between cloud and locally hosted applications that just don’t play together well.

But a tightly aligned, collaborative arrangement with a S&P provider can help alleviate these challenges. “A real partnership between businesses and their procurement provider can be very powerful,” says Paul Blake, Associate Director for GEP. “A partner with domain expertise in sourcing and procurement coupled with a ‘built-in-the-cloud’ software platform that can break down information silos can take a large burden off the CPO and the CIO.”

To read this article in full, please click here