BrandPost: Re-imagining Business Operations with Robotic Process Automation

IBM and IDG Content

When asked by IBM how artificial intelligence (AI) couple help them become more competitive, executives at organizations globally identified three primary areas of impact: delivering more personalized customer experiences, enhancing forecasting and decision-making, and optimizing business processes.

Arguably, the last of these three areas is seeing the most rapid and widespread adoption of AI-enhanced solutions. Many organizations have already tapped robotic process automation (RPA) technology to automate routine or repetitive tasks traditionally performed by people. RPA solutions, which enlist “software robots” or “bots” to perform their jobs, can range from basic to complex, with the latter potentially encompassing many interoperating bots and additional AI technologies.

To read this article in full, please click here

IBM and IDG Content

When asked by IBM how artificial intelligence (AI) couple help them become more competitive, executives at organizations globally identified three primary areas of impact: delivering more personalized customer experiences, enhancing forecasting and decision-making, and optimizing business processes.

Arguably, the last of these three areas is seeing the most rapid and widespread adoption of AI-enhanced solutions. Many organizations have already tapped robotic process automation (RPA) technology to automate routine or repetitive tasks traditionally performed by people. RPA solutions, which enlist “software robots” or “bots” to perform their jobs, can range from basic to complex, with the latter potentially encompassing many interoperating bots and additional AI technologies.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Re-imagining Business Operations with Robotic Process Automation

IBM and IDG Content

When asked by IBM how artificial intelligence (AI) couple help them become more competitive, executives at organizations globally identified three primary areas of impact: delivering more personalized customer experiences, enhancing forecasting and decision-making, and optimizing business processes.

Arguably, the last of these three areas is seeing the most rapid and widespread adoption of AI-enhanced solutions. Many organizations have already tapped robotic process automation (RPA) technology to automate routine or repetitive tasks traditionally performed by people. RPA solutions, which enlist “software robots” or “bots” to perform their jobs, can range from basic to complex, with the latter potentially encompassing many interoperating bots and additional AI technologies.

To read this article in full, please click here

IBM and IDG Content

When asked by IBM how artificial intelligence (AI) couple help them become more competitive, executives at organizations globally identified three primary areas of impact: delivering more personalized customer experiences, enhancing forecasting and decision-making, and optimizing business processes.

Arguably, the last of these three areas is seeing the most rapid and widespread adoption of AI-enhanced solutions. Many organizations have already tapped robotic process automation (RPA) technology to automate routine or repetitive tasks traditionally performed by people. RPA solutions, which enlist “software robots” or “bots” to perform their jobs, can range from basic to complex, with the latter potentially encompassing many interoperating bots and additional AI technologies.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: CapEx and OpEx – What’s the Best Option for Technology Investments?

There’s a lot of debate around whether Capital Expenditures (CapEx) or Operational Expenditures (OpEx) is the better way to go in regard to technology investments. A number of organizations think it’s better to have more CapEx – that is, investments in the actual physical resources behind the technology (for example, servers, network pipes or hardware). On the other hand, some organizations argue in favour of having more OpEx: Paying month-to-month for services makes more sense to their business model, and they prefer the flexibility that OpEx offers. Here are frequently asked questions and answers.


Which option is more beneficial for organizations when adopting new technology in their business? 

To read this article in full, please click here

There’s a lot of debate around whether Capital Expenditures (CapEx) or Operational Expenditures (OpEx) is the better way to go in regard to technology investments. A number of organizations think it’s better to have more CapEx – that is, investments in the actual physical resources behind the technology (for example, servers, network pipes or hardware). On the other hand, some organizations argue in favour of having more OpEx: Paying month-to-month for services makes more sense to their business model, and they prefer the flexibility that OpEx offers. Here are frequently asked questions and answers.


Which option is more beneficial for organizations when adopting new technology in their business? 

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: CapEx and OpEx – What’s the Best Option for Technology Investments?

There’s a lot of debate around whether Capital Expenditures (CapEx) or Operational Expenditures (OpEx) is the better way to go in regard to technology investments. A number of organizations think it’s better to have more CapEx – that is, investments in the actual physical resources behind the technology (for example, servers, network pipes or hardware). On the other hand, some organizations argue in favour of having more OpEx: Paying month-to-month for services makes more sense to their business model, and they prefer the flexibility that OpEx offers. Here are frequently asked questions and answers.


Which option is more beneficial for organizations when adopting new technology in their business? 

To read this article in full, please click here

There’s a lot of debate around whether Capital Expenditures (CapEx) or Operational Expenditures (OpEx) is the better way to go in regard to technology investments. A number of organizations think it’s better to have more CapEx – that is, investments in the actual physical resources behind the technology (for example, servers, network pipes or hardware). On the other hand, some organizations argue in favour of having more OpEx: Paying month-to-month for services makes more sense to their business model, and they prefer the flexibility that OpEx offers. Here are frequently asked questions and answers.


Which option is more beneficial for organizations when adopting new technology in their business? 

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Everybody Wins with Technology Business Management

Transforming through Technology Business Management (TBM) can be a tough challenge. TBM can improve the visibility of IT at the levels of cost and performance, allowing the organization to make better technology decisions. And yet, many organizations struggle on their TBM journey with issues such as trusting company data, general skepticism, and the fact that change, of any kind, is hard.

But the truth is that there are no winners and losers when it comes to TBM, says Kimberly Sorensen, Director in KPMG’s CIO Advisory practice — instead, everybody wins. The business wins by fundamentally changing the way it makes decisions about technology, while IT wins by becoming a strategic partner to the business. The entire company wins by increasing the speed of decision-making, accurately determining costs, and controlling consumption. So, how can you win the entire organization over to committing to a successful TBM transformation?

To read this article in full, please click here

Transforming through Technology Business Management (TBM) can be a tough challenge. TBM can improve the visibility of IT at the levels of cost and performance, allowing the organization to make better technology decisions. And yet, many organizations struggle on their TBM journey with issues such as trusting company data, general skepticism, and the fact that change, of any kind, is hard.

But the truth is that there are no winners and losers when it comes to TBM, says Kimberly Sorensen, Director in KPMG’s CIO Advisory practice — instead, everybody wins. The business wins by fundamentally changing the way it makes decisions about technology, while IT wins by becoming a strategic partner to the business. The entire company wins by increasing the speed of decision-making, accurately determining costs, and controlling consumption. So, how can you win the entire organization over to committing to a successful TBM transformation?

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Why HPC Matters: Understanding Our Universe

Searching for gravitational waves and exploring the physics of black holes and warped space-time is all in a day’s work for teams of researchers in Australia. This is the type of work conducted by the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav). And it’s the type of work that couldn’t be carried out without the extreme computational power of a supercomputer.

In OzGrav’s case, the computational power is delivered via a new $4 million Dell EMC supercomputer launched at Swinburne University of Technology. The supercomputer, named OzSTAR, delivers an astounding peak performance of 1.2 petaflops, making it one of the most powerful supercomputers in Australia. What does that mean in layman’s terms? OzGrav’s director, Professor Matthew Bailes, explains it this way: “In one second, OzSTAR can perform 10,000 calculations for every one of the 100 billion stars in our galaxy.”1

To read this article in full, please click here

Searching for gravitational waves and exploring the physics of black holes and warped space-time is all in a day’s work for teams of researchers in Australia. This is the type of work conducted by the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav). And it’s the type of work that couldn’t be carried out without the extreme computational power of a supercomputer.

In OzGrav’s case, the computational power is delivered via a new $4 million Dell EMC supercomputer launched at Swinburne University of Technology. The supercomputer, named OzSTAR, delivers an astounding peak performance of 1.2 petaflops, making it one of the most powerful supercomputers in Australia. What does that mean in layman’s terms? OzGrav’s director, Professor Matthew Bailes, explains it this way: “In one second, OzSTAR can perform 10,000 calculations for every one of the 100 billion stars in our galaxy.”1

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: How to Staff a Data Factory

The most in‑demand IT roles today are full‑stack developer, DevOps engineer, and data scientist. The first two jobs didn’t exist a decade ago. The third was only beginning to gain mainstream recognition. That finding, from a recent study by Indeed.com, suggests a broad shift in how IT departments operate—one with big implications for workers, CIOs and CISOs alike.

For years, the core purpose of IT was managing a company’s tech infrastructure and systems of record. The top jobs a decade ago—database and network admins, Java developer and SAP consultant, according to staffing firm Yoh—belonged to experts who understood how to use and maintain those systems.

To read this article in full, please click here

The most in‑demand IT roles today are full‑stack developer, DevOps engineer, and data scientist. The first two jobs didn’t exist a decade ago. The third was only beginning to gain mainstream recognition. That finding, from a recent study by Indeed.com, suggests a broad shift in how IT departments operate—one with big implications for workers, CIOs and CISOs alike.

For years, the core purpose of IT was managing a company’s tech infrastructure and systems of record. The top jobs a decade ago—database and network admins, Java developer and SAP consultant, according to staffing firm Yoh—belonged to experts who understood how to use and maintain those systems.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Four Best Practices to Reduce the Pain of an Oracle License Audit

By Jeremy Sayler

The words “license audit” are guaranteed to strike fear into the heart of any Oracle customer today. At best, going through the audit process is a hassle. At worst, it can result in an unexpected hit to the IT budget – even if you’ve been trying in good faith to play by the vendor’s rules.

Across the globe, CIOs are working to optimize IT budgets and reduce the burden of costly annual vendor maintenance fees. They want to focus on driving innovation and growth into their businesses. But like death and taxes, vendor audits are inescapable – typically occurring at least once every three to four years for Oracle. If your organization is not prepared, an audit could divert thousands, if not millions of dollars away from critical projects. Proving that you are in compliance and clearing up any problems can just be expensive and a drain on resources.

To read this article in full, please click here

By Jeremy Sayler

The words “license audit” are guaranteed to strike fear into the heart of any Oracle customer today. At best, going through the audit process is a hassle. At worst, it can result in an unexpected hit to the IT budget – even if you’ve been trying in good faith to play by the vendor’s rules.

Across the globe, CIOs are working to optimize IT budgets and reduce the burden of costly annual vendor maintenance fees. They want to focus on driving innovation and growth into their businesses. But like death and taxes, vendor audits are inescapable – typically occurring at least once every three to four years for Oracle. If your organization is not prepared, an audit could divert thousands, if not millions of dollars away from critical projects. Proving that you are in compliance and clearing up any problems can just be expensive and a drain on resources.

To read this article in full, please click here

BrandPost: Today, HPC Is Everywhere — and That’s Good News for All of Us

At Dell EMC, the roots of our high-performance computing solutions begin with our community of customers, technology partners and experts in different disciplines. We listen to our community, and then work collaboratively with our customers and part…

At Dell EMC, the roots of our high-performance computing solutions begin with our community of customers, technology partners and experts in different disciplines. We listen to our community, and then work collaboratively with our customers and partners to deliver HPC solutions that solve real-world problems.

This, in a few words, is what the recent Dell EMC HPC Community Meeting in Austin, TX, was all about. This worldwide technical forum fosters an exchange of ideas among researchers, computer scientists, technologists and engineers to promote the advancement of innovative HPC solutions. At these gatherings, we encourage sustained discussions among experts that lead to the design, deployment, operation and usage of highly effective HPC solutions.

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BrandPost: Measuring Agile Performance

In the digital business era, anything that slows down an organization is a recipe for market decline. Many organizations are turning to agile development tools and methodologies to speed up their efforts to respond to changing customer needs and new business opportunities. At the same time, many are uncertain how to measure progress and success, particularly as efforts scale up from small, discrete projects to those that have a broad impact on business agility.

A 2017 survey by Gatepoint Research revealed that 75% of respondents report wanting to move toward business agility in some way, but only 39% are confidently on their way. Among the survey respondents there is widespread recognition that business agility is likely to deliver faster time to act on new opportunities; higher customer satisfaction and retention; increased employee productivity and retention; reduced costs; and competitive advantage.

To read this article in full, please click here

In the digital business era, anything that slows down an organization is a recipe for market decline. Many organizations are turning to agile development tools and methodologies to speed up their efforts to respond to changing customer needs and new business opportunities. At the same time, many are uncertain how to measure progress and success, particularly as efforts scale up from small, discrete projects to those that have a broad impact on business agility.

A 2017 survey by Gatepoint Research revealed that 75% of respondents report wanting to move toward business agility in some way, but only 39% are confidently on their way. Among the survey respondents there is widespread recognition that business agility is likely to deliver faster time to act on new opportunities; higher customer satisfaction and retention; increased employee productivity and retention; reduced costs; and competitive advantage.

To read this article in full, please click here